Klein Tools - A History Of Excellence

Published by Justin McCarter on Sep 18th 2013

Pre-modern telecommunications typically didn't need good hand tools aside from a good, sturdy stick. But as the guys banging out coded drumbeats, blowing on horns, and tooting loud whistles were quickly replace with telegraph linemen, the need for durable tools for the professional tradesmen increased dramatically. Klein Tools for Trade Professionals Klein Tools began producing lineman tools in their Chicago blacksmith shop in 1857. The soon-to-follow Civil War (not their fault) demonstrated the critical need for rapid communication, and telegraph lines began to crisscross the United States. Telegraph lines were followed by telephone lines, then the electric light came, and linemen were pulling cable as fast as they could. Many of them were pulling and crimping with Klein tools. They still are. Today Klein tools are the preferred hand tool for professional electricians as well as a range of other trades. They have supplemented their product line over the years with smart accessories such as the classic Klein Canvas Bucket for tools and equipment and sturdy equipment bags made of vinyl for extreme durability. Klein produces the majority of their products in the US, and has seven production facilities across the country. While many companies are sending production away from the US as fast as they can, Klein continues to retool their existing facilities and open new ones. The tools Klein produces are designed for professional use. They are not the cheapest tools around. But as the saying goes "If you buy coach, you fly coach". Those who take pride in their work and take care of their tools know smart ratcheting wrench sets increase efficiency, while line pulling Chicago Grips have been refined and perfected over the years to improve safety and alignment of the wire and cable being installed. At the end of the day, the choice is clear. Klein quality translates to a stronger, more confident handle on the task at hand. Better tools used correctly can result in a better end product. And who doesn't prefer to work smarter than harder?